Review: Makers: The new industrial revolution (by Chris Anderson)

Book: Makers: The new industrial revolution
Author: Chris Anderson
Publisher: Crown Business (October 2, 2012)

The cover story of this month’s issue of Wired Magazine is all about how “the new MakerBot Replicator might just change your world.” Indeed, Wired has been pimping the do-it-yourself world of 3D printing, robotics, and the maker movement aggressively over the past few months. It should come as no surprise that Wired editor Chris Anderson’s new book, Makers: The new industrial revolution is being released this month as well.

Anderson writes on the maker revolution — that is, the intersection of manufacturing with a punk way of thinking. Do-it-yourself product creation, new markets for sharing ideas, and new technologies that allow for affordable, small-scale manufacturing, he argues, will transform the global economy.

The emerging maker economy is a realization of Alvin Toffler‘s prosumers: “proactive consumers” who become active in the design and creation of goods and services, and shift the responsibilities of product creation toward the consumer, not the producer.

Anderson dives deep into the observation that the old rules of economies of scale (which require large run sizes to leverage) and specialization (focusing your efforts on one unique task) break apart:

Increasingly, when computers are running the production machines, it costs no more to make each product different. If you’ve ever received a catalog or magazine in the mail that has a personalized message for you, that’s a formerly one-size-fits-all production machine –the printing press– turned into digital one-size-fits- one machine, using little more than a big version of the desktop inkjet printer. Likewise when you buy a cake with fancy icing from the supermarket. That icing was applied by a robot arm –it can make each cake design different as quickly as making them all the same– personalizing it costs no more to do, yet the supermarket can charge more for it because it is perceived as more valuable. The old model of expensive custom machines that had to make the same thing in vast numbers to justify to tooling expense is fading fast.

Indeed, the retail sector is transforming from a business of selling things into one of creating experiences or perceived personal value for consumers. Anderson calls this “happiness economics.” The digitization of components and ideas and realizing them with new, low-cost, small scale manufacturing allow people to cut, paste, remix, and share their creations alike, with the potential to create a new market based on creative ideas and their related design files.

The book focuses on four technologies that are leading the DIY and small scale manufacturing revolution: CNC machines, laser cutters, and 3D scanners. All of these are common at Fab Labs and maker hack “factories” around the world.

While Anderson captures the essence of the maker movement, I feel he fails to connect it with the parallel revolution happening in the software and microelectronics industries, especially where these ideas are expressed as accessible maker tools such as the Arduino. He shines, however, as he looks toward a future where the same revolution is transforming biology (bioengineering) and other fields that previously required expensive, dedicated laboratories. For only a few thousand dollars today, an individual can acquire key components for genetic manipulation –something that, only a few years ago, cost labs 100- if not 1,000-times that amount. And these costs are still decreasing.

Dangerous or not, a revolution is happening. And, Anderson is spreading the word.

In light of the maker revolution, are schools preparing kids for the wrong economy?


Note: The publisher provided a copy of the book for review. Please read our review policy for more details on how we review products and services.

Quotes from the book were extracted from a galley proof, and may change in the final publication.